Dispatch: The second step in the chain of survival is ‘dispatch’, which involves activating emergency medical services. In most cases, this involves calling 911. Medical dispatch should be thoroughly trained to identify a possible stroke patient so that the appropriate level of EMS services can be dispatched to the patient.  Simply stated, the faster EMS can be dispatched, the quicker lifesaving treatment can be delivered.
Fast recognition and treatment can not only make the difference between life and death, but it can also decrease long-term disabilities. To develop a streamlined response to potential stroke patients, the American Heart Association developed the Stroke Chain of Survival. The chain involves eight links or steps to be taken by patients, family members, prehospital and emergency room personnel in caring for stroke patients.
If you think you are having a stroke, call 911 so an ambulance can quickly get to the hospital. When talking to 911, an emergency medical service or the hospital, be sure to use the word “stroke” in order to possibly speed up a diagnosis. Every minute counts when treating a stroke, raising the number of brain cells that can be saved and chances for recovery.
The family is one of the most important providers for the elderly. In fact, the majority of caregivers for the elderly are often members of their own family, most often a daughter or a granddaughter. Family and friends can provide a home (i.e. have elderly relatives live with them), help with money and meet social needs by visiting, taking them out on trips, etc.
continuous, uninterrupted - continuing in time or space without interruption; "a continuous rearrangement of electrons in the solar atoms results in the emission of light"- James Jeans; "a continuous bout of illness lasting six months"; "lived in continuous fear"; "a continuous row of warehouses"; "a continuous line has no gaps or breaks in it"; "moving midweek holidays to the nearest Monday or Friday allows uninterrupted work weeks"
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