Decision: A ‘decision’ regarding the type of treatment needed is the next step in caring for a patient with a stroke. Information, such as the type of stroke which has occurred and the time from onset of symptoms, is considered before a treatment decision is made. The severity of the stroke may also play a role in deciding what the most appropriate treatment will be. The patient and family members should also be informed of the risks and benefits of treatment options.
Finally, you should know about the end-of-life resources that are available to you in your home. Home hospice care is often covered by Medicare or other insurance; the cost is typically between $20-$50/hour. You'll have a team of workers that may include a care companion, social worker, nurse, and/or chaplain, and they'll help provide your loved one with comfort and pain management. You can find this type of support by searching hospice. You can also search in-home care and ask providers to tell you what hospice options they offer.
The overall goal of stroke care is to minimize brain injury and optimize the individual’s recovery. Preferential transport to stroke-capable centers has been shown to improve outcomes. Stroke centers are equipped with resources often not available at smaller community hospitals. The presence of specialists, including neurologists and stroke care specialists, multidisciplinary teams experienced in stroke care, advanced imaging modalities, and other therapeutic options make transport to stroke centers the most suitable option. The goal of the stroke team, emergency physician, or other experts should be to assess the individual with suspected stroke within ten minutes.

This app comes equipped with a calendar, to-do list, and notes built in, so you don’t have to jump between these separate apps on your device. It will connect the things you use most in life, like utilities, service providers, banks, and social networks, and then it will automatically tell you what you need to do. In that sense, it’s very similar to an actual personal assistant, who might be tasked with managing your schedule and keeping things running on time. 24me is available on Google Play and the iTunes app store.

I tell my patients if you don’t remember anything in the weeks you’ve been here as an inpatient, the one thing I want you to remember is to see your primary care doctor for regular follow-ups and checkups. Your primary care doctor is essential to your recovery from a stroke, and can make sure your medication needs and health issues are being attended to properly.
This is another app that is very similar to an actual personal assistant. If you’re in need of someone to take notes or to summarize your meetings, this is the app for you. Tetra uses artificial intelligence to take notes and keep your team in sync. Your team members can place conference calls through the app, which will highlight important moments from the call and will send notes to all members upon call completion, allowing everyone to focus on the conversation instead of having to take personal notes. Tetra is available on the iTunes app store.  
Emergency measures. If you take warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) or anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix) to prevent blood clots, you may be given drugs or transfusions of blood products to counteract the blood thinners' effects. You may also be given drugs to lower pressure in your brain (intracranial pressure), lower your blood pressure, prevent vasospasm or prevent seizures.
Sunrise Senior Living received the highest numerical score in the J.D. Power 2018 Senior Living Satisfaction Study, based on 2,539 total responses among 7 senior living communities measuring experiences and perceptions of residents/family members/friends, surveyed October-December 2017. Your experiences may vary. Award applicable to United States only. Visit jdpower.com
“At UofL Hospital, we continually strive for excellence in the acute treatment of stroke patients,” said Kerri Remmel, M.D., Ph.D., medical director of the UofL Hospital Stroke Center and chair of the UofL Department of Neurology. “U Care adds the vital step of thoroughly programmed follow-up with stroke patients to ensure they continue recovery, avoid unnecessary readmission to the hospital and prevent a second stroke.”
Before the inspection, we reviewed the information we held about the service. This included the previous inspection report and notifications since the last inspection. Notifications are changes, events and incidents that the service must inform us about. We used information the provider sent us in the Provider Information Return (PIR). This is information we require providers to send us at least once annually to give some key information about the service, what the service does well and improvements they plan to make.
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