The Hound app claims to be the “best way to search using your natural voice.” It uses familiar sites like NPR, Accuweather, Yelp, Uber, Sportradar, and Expedia to complete common tasks and to give you the most up-to-date information. If you’re looking for a new car, consider a Hyundai, which in 2019 is launching a voice-enabled, AI-equipped car powered by Houndify. Hound is available on Google Play and the iTunes app store.
On both occasions I used their service, the caregivers either left minimal or no notes while visiting my elderly parents (no eating, sleeping or bathroom data). After the first visit, I contacted a supervisor at Around the Clock and asked specifically that the caregivers leave notes on eating, sleeping patterns, etc. Instead of improving, on the 2nd visit I only received notes from 1 of 3 caregivers...I paid for 16 hours of caregiving for people who may or may not have even showed up for all I know. Their medical staff is also hit and miss. On my father's post-hospital rehab, one of the 3 nurses missed appts at the house repeatedly...only making 1 of 5 scheduled appointments. After this, I contacted Around the Clock and asked them to send out a more reliable nurse. In the 5 weeks that have passed since, we have received 1 visit from a nurse...nobody makes their scheduled appointments. Is this the care you want for your elderly parents??
If your loved one needs medical care that requires medical expertise, you'll need a home health agency to find a registered nurse (RN), licensed practical nurse (LPN), or advanced practical nurse (APN). Nurses have the skills necessary to change catheters, give postsurgical care, treat wounds or bedsores, and oversee medical equipment. If your loved one is recovering from surgery or an accident, a home health care nurse may be covered by Medicare or other insurance; nurses usually charge $25-$50/hour.

In the United States, most of the large multi-facility providers are publicly owned and managed as for-profit businesses.[10] There are exceptions; the largest operator in the US is the Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, a not-for-profit organization that manages 6,531 beds in 22 states, according to a 1995 study by the American Health Care Association.[14]
Stroke patients who are taken to the hospital in an ambulance may get diagnosed and treated more quickly than people who do not arrive in an ambulance.1 This is because emergency treatment starts on the way to the hospital. The emergency workers may take you to a specialized stroke centerExternal to ensure that you receive the quickest possible diagnosis and treatment. The emergency workers will also collect valuable information that guides treatment and alert hospital medical staff before you arrive at the emergency room, giving them time to prepare.

Having all this expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion. Your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and the most highly specialized stroke experts in the world are all working together for you. What might take months to accomplish elsewhere can typically be done in a matter of days at Mayo Clinic.
Dementia In-Home Care is a complete in-home service for clients showing signs of dementia. Whereas Alzheimer’s disease can be specifically diagnosed, ‘dementia’ is the general term used to describe symptoms which include cognitive decline and memory loss. Alzeimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Huntington’s disease are a few known causes of dementia symptoms.
Many seniors with memory loss benefit greatly by getting out of the house and participating in a memory care program made just for them. Aspen Senior Day Center is Utah Valley’s only licensed senior day care center. It’s located in Provo and serves seniors from all over the valley. To learn more about this low-cost senior care option, just click here.
A local example of the life-saving stroke care making a difference was a man who came to Marshall North ER in June with weakness and impaired speech. Tests showed the patient to be a candidate for teleneurology and possible tPA – a clot busting medication. Through the teleneurology system – which links rural hospitals with a neurologist at Huntsville Hospital using a computer monitor – the medical team determined tPA should be administered. The patient received the drug and, after close monitoring, was transferred to Huntsville Hospital.

When someone is having symptoms of a stroke – slurred speech, sudden leg or arm weakness, facial drooping, loss of balance or visual changes – getting them to the hospital quickly can mean the difference between recovery and permanent disability. One of the best treatments for ischemic stroke is treatment with the clot-busting drug, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, or IV tPA. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, IV tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. UofL Hospital Stroke Center staff strive to deliver IV tPA to appropriate patients within 45 minutes to one hour from the time they arrive at the hospital.
ATTENTION: If you speak English, assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call (877) 285-6920; TTY: (877) 893-8199. For assistance in the following languages: العربية | | 中文 | Nederlands | Français | Deutsche | ελληνικά | ગુજરાતી | हिंदी | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | ਪੰਜਾਬੀ | Pennsylvania Nederlands | Polskie | русский | Español | Pilipino | اردو | Tiếng Việt
“We are thrilled to support the University of Louisville Hospital – Comprehensive Stroke Center’s U Care program with our RN-led clinical AfterCare model. Patients and their caregivers need more resources and ongoing support when managing the transition from a hospitalization to another setting or home. We look forward to implementing this model and future programs to help UofL Hospital provide a differentiated patient experience for the communities it serves,” said Brian Holzer, M.D., M.B.A., C.E.O. of Lacuna Health.
Fast recognition and treatment can not only make the difference between life and death, but it can also decrease long-term disabilities. To develop a streamlined response to potential stroke patients, the American Heart Association developed the Stroke Chain of Survival. The chain involves eight links or steps to be taken by patients, family members, prehospital and emergency room personnel in caring for stroke patients.

U Care was developed in partnership with Lacuna Health, a subsidiary of Kindred Healthcare, to follow up with patients after they leave the hospital. Registered nurses with U Care reach out to patients by phone on a regular schedule to monitor the patients’ recovery progress, check their medications, ensure they have made appropriate follow-up appointments and answer any questions or health concerns that arise. The nurses have access to the patients’ health records and can escalate any concerns to hospital staff or physicians if a patient requires further clarification or intervention. The program pilot, which began in June, will follow 250 stroke patients for 45 days after discharge, whether they went home or to a rehab facility for recovery.


“At UofL Hospital, we continually strive for excellence in the acute treatment of stroke patients,” said Dr. Kerri Remmel, medical director of the UofL Hospital Stroke Center and chair of the UofL Department of Neurology. “U Care adds the vital step of thoroughly programmed follow-up with stroke patients to ensure they continue recovery, avoid unnecessary readmission to the hospital and prevent a second stroke.”

“We are currently negotiating funding with the HSE, to further develop the service so that it’s rapidly available to everybody,” says Thornton. “We began the service without any additional funding or new structures in place. There are charities such as the Irish Heart Foundation that are currently in the process of reviewing guidelines to publish a formal protocol for patients and doctors on how to approach and deal with a large-vessel stroke. But we need the HSE to formally recognise the importance of medical thrombectomy and to support urgent development of the service because it is essential that stroke patients in Ireland are getting the best standard of care possible.”
Nurse Next Door’s around-the-clock care gives you on-going companionship and support every day and every evening. Whether it’s 3 in the afternoon, or 3 in the middle of the night, our comprehensive health services program will support you with compassionate and attentive assistance any time you need it. From providing medication in the evening, to assisting you with getting dressed in the morning, we will ensure you have around-the-clock home care for situations that may require close monitoring. Rest easy knowing you will always have someone by your side to attend to your needs if and when necessary.
×