Surgical AVM removal. Surgeons may remove a smaller AVM if it's located in an accessible area of your brain, to eliminate the risk of rupture and lower the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. However, it's not always possible to remove an AVM if its removal would cause too large a reduction in brain function, or if it's large or located deep within your brain.

When someone is having symptoms of a stroke – slurred speech, sudden leg or arm weakness, facial drooping, loss of balance or visual changes – getting them to the hospital quickly can mean the difference between recovery and permanent disability. One of the best treatments for ischemic stroke is treatment with the clot-busting drug, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, or IV tPA. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, IV tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. UofL Hospital Stroke Center staff strive to deliver IV tPA to appropriate patients within 45 minutes to one hour from the time they arrive at the hospital.
Information about long-term care options in the United States can be found by contacting the local Area Agency on Aging[20] or elder referral agencies such as Silver Living or A Place for Mom. Furthermore, the U.S. government recommends evaluation of health care facilities through websites using data collected from sources such as Medicare records.[21]
“Mechanical thrombectomy is a treatment used to remove a large blood clot from inside a blood vessel in a patient’s brain,” explains Dr John Thornton. “Before this was developed, Irish patients were receiving clot-busting drugs to help dissolve the clot instead of pulling the clot out but what became evident was that these drugs didn’t work as well when there was a large blockage in the brain. Thrombectomy provides the greatest chance of patient recovery from large blockages which cause the most devastating strokes.”

We believe that continuous improvement from onset through to post-treatment care is critically important to ensure stroke patients have access to the right therapy at the right time.1 Working together – through our Stroke Care Solution – we can improve patients’ access to advanced stroke therapy by addressing systemic issues. We’re partnering with healthcare professionals to pinpoint gaps in processes, establish root causes, and implement changes to create efficiencies and optimize coordinated care. Let’s collaborate to develop a tailored solution to help you achieve enhanced clinical and financial outcomes.


This app is an easy-to-use voice-activated assistant that offers many of the same features listed in the apps above. Lyra offers the added feature of continuing the same conversation across multiple devices like smartphones, tablets, and computers by logging in to keep everything connected. Its creator claims you can speak to Lyra in any dialect, as it is “capable of understanding multiple languages, context, and intent.” Lyra is available on Google Play and the iTunes app store.  
Dispatch: The second step in the chain of survival is ‘dispatch’, which involves activating emergency medical services. In most cases, this involves calling 911. Medical dispatch should be thoroughly trained to identify a possible stroke patient so that the appropriate level of EMS services can be dispatched to the patient.  Simply stated, the faster EMS can be dispatched, the quicker lifesaving treatment can be delivered.
Companion helpers are hands off, non-medical helpers that help those in need by assisting with activities of daily living (ADLs) in order to continue living life from the comfort of home. Companion help can include meal preparation, assistance with light housekeeping, laundry, accompaniment to outings and appointments, socialization, medication reminders and assistance with morning and bedtime routine. The specific needs are set up between you and the individual that you choose to hire after evaluating resumes and other materials.
×