We are not anti-facility. We just know that most seniors want to stay in their homes for as long as possible. Many times this can be until they pass away. We also know that moving a senior to a facility is usually the final move and the most difficult one because everything changes–their surroundings, their neighbors, their church house and they have to leave many precious memories behind. It’s got to be the toughest move we ever make in life. That’s why we do what we do.

The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research offers an elite center for stroke rehabilitation that combines medical and nursing care with counseling and support, not only for your loved one but also for you and your family. All patient rooms include modern equipment that is specifically designed to offer comfort and functionality. Your friend or family member can benefit from individual or group therapy sessions, physical and occupational therapy, speech therapy, and periodical evaluations from highly trained specialists. Patients can also take part in occupational therapy, a form of therapy that helps patients regain skills and functions necessary in getting them back to work. Each type of therapy is individualized to fit the needs of the patient. One important service offered by TIRR is an outpatient rehabilitation program that will help your loved one continue recovery after leaving the facility.
This is another app that is very similar to an actual personal assistant. If you’re in need of someone to take notes or to summarize your meetings, this is the app for you. Tetra uses artificial intelligence to take notes and keep your team in sync. Your team members can place conference calls through the app, which will highlight important moments from the call and will send notes to all members upon call completion, allowing everyone to focus on the conversation instead of having to take personal notes. Tetra is available on the iTunes app store.  
We believe that continuous improvement from onset through to post-treatment care is critically important to ensure stroke patients have access to the right therapy at the right time.1 Working together – through our Stroke Care Solution – we can improve patients’ access to advanced stroke therapy by addressing systemic issues. We’re partnering with healthcare professionals to pinpoint gaps in processes, establish root causes, and implement changes to create efficiencies and optimize coordinated care. Let’s collaborate to develop a tailored solution to help you achieve enhanced clinical and financial outcomes.
Recently, as part of the celebration of National Rural Health Day, Bradley County Medical Center announced it has been recognized by The Chartis Center of Rural Health and the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH) for overall excellence in Outcomes, reflecting top quartile performance among all rural hospitals in the nation.
The form of care provided for older adults varies greatly among countries and is changing rapidly.[2] Even within the same country, regional differences exist with respect to the care for older adults.[3] However, it has been observed globally, older people consume the most health expenditures out of any other age group,[4] observation that shows comprehensive eldercare may be very similar. One must also account for an increasingly large proportion older people worldwide, especially in developing nations, as continued pressure is put on limiting fertility and decreasing family size.[5]
After you’re treated for stroke, you may be screened for atrial fibrillation (AFib)—a heart rhythm disorder that, untreated, causes an estimated 15 percent of strokes. Because an irregular heartbeat may not appear for weeks, your Cone Health doctors may recommend placing an implantable loop recorder—a small device that can monitor your heart for up to three years, giving us a better chance of uncovering your AFib and helping you prevent subsequent strokes. Cone Health is a leader and early adapter of this technology for stroke prevention.
Drug/Device: Drug administration, if appropriate, is the next link in the chain of survival. If the patient is a candidate for fibrinolytic therapy, the window of opportunity for administration is narrow. According to the American Heart Association guidelines, fibrinolytic therapy should be administered within three hours of the onset of symptoms. If the patient is not a candidate for drug therapy they may qualify for Endovascular therapy to remove the clot mechanically rather than with fibrinolytics.
Before the inspection, we reviewed the information we held about the service. This included the previous inspection report and notifications since the last inspection. Notifications are changes, events and incidents that the service must inform us about. We used information the provider sent us in the Provider Information Return (PIR). This is information we require providers to send us at least once annually to give some key information about the service, what the service does well and improvements they plan to make.
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