“We are thrilled to support the University of Louisville Hospital – Comprehensive Stroke Center’s U Care program with our RN-led clinical AfterCare model. Patients and their caregivers need more resources and ongoing support when managing the transition from a hospitalization to another setting or home. We look forward to implementing this model and future programs to help UofL Hospital provide a differentiated patient experience for the communities it serves,” said Dr. Brian Holzer, CEO of Lacuna Health.
“At UofL Hospital, we continually strive for excellence in the acute treatment of stroke patients,” said Kerri Remmel, M.D., Ph.D., medical director of the UofL Hospital Stroke Center and chair of the UofL Department of Neurology. “U Care adds the vital step of thoroughly programmed follow-up with stroke patients to ensure they continue recovery, avoid unnecessary readmission to the hospital and prevent a second stroke.”
Providing a comprehensive, best in class portfolio of educational programs and interactive engagements that improve technical and clinical skills, stroke team dynamics and patient pathways is an integral component to our commitment in advancing Complete Stroke Care. Stryker supports providers in the stroke care continuum seeking high-quality, high-impact education to aid in their pursuit of superior outcomes.
Best Personal Care is a wonderful facility. I put my father at this facility 10 months ago. The staff at Best Personal Care communicated consistently and helped my father to become independent again. They made sure that he took all his meds and took him to his doctor appointments. They also were very helpful in making sure that he had continuous activities to help keep his mind occupied. I highly recommend Best Personal Care. Arnie and Anglelina are very caring people. My father has been to many other facilities that were not near as proactive with his care. Best Personal Care lives up to their name and made a big difference in helping my father to get better and be able to live independently again.
Mayo Clinic provides easy access to its stroke rehabilitation services by working with numerous insurance companies, and in most cases, doesn’t require a referral from a physician. Once you’ve made an appointment, your loved one will be evaluated by doctors with extensive training in neurology, emergency medicine, rehabilitation, and other specialties. Doctors from the Mayo Clinic treat approximately 15,000 people who have suffered from stroke or similar conditions each year, so you can count on their expertise. For diagnostic purposes, Mayo Clinic uses advanced technology and imaging tests. One special type of diagnosis used at this facility is stroke telemedicine, or telestroke. Used only by doctors with advanced training and involving video cameras, the Internet, and advanced robotic equipment, telestroke is used to evaluate patients who have suffered from acute strokes.

Physician assistants (PA) typically obtain medical histories, perform examinations and procedures, order treatments, diagnose diseases, prescribe medication, order and interpret diagnostic tests, refer patients to specialists as required, and first or second-assist in surgery. Their education includes a bachelor’s degree, extensive clinical training from an accredited PA program and they must obtain a license to practice as a physician assistant.
Expertise and experience. Mayo Clinic's campuses in Florida and Minnesota are certified as comprehensive stroke centers by The Joint Commission, a national organization that evaluates and accredits hospitals and staff. Mayo Clinic's campus in Arizona, and the Mayo Clinic Health System sites in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, La Crosse, Wisconsin, and Mankato, Minnesota, are certified as primary stroke centers by The Joint Commission.

Not every warning sign will occur in every stroke. And even if they do go away, these warning signs should not be ignored. A TIA (transient ischemic attack) is sometimes referred to as a mini-stroke, and produces symptoms similar to a stroke that only last for a short time. But TIA symptoms serve as an important warning that a stroke could be imminent, and it’s important to respond the same way to a TIA as you would to stroke symptoms.


I go to an assigned clients house. I begin the day by making breakfast and starting laundry, after breakfast I wash the dishes. I usually sit with the client for awhile after that set up medicine and remind them to take it then ask what the plan for the day is. Go to grocery or run errands for the client if needed, I hang up laundry , vacuum, clean bathroom and take out trash. Every client has different needs. My days aren't the same all the time.

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